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"The colossal book of mathematics"

The colossal book of mathematics pdf

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Buy The Colossal Book of Mathematics: Classic Puzzles, Paradoxes, and Problems by Gardner, Martin online on bop.calcionotizie24.net at best prices. ✓ Fast and free. The Colossal Book of Mathematics collects together Gardner's most popular pieces from his legendary "Mathematical Games" column, which ran in Scientific. In its twelve sections, The Colossal Book of Math explores a wide range of areas, each startlingly illuminated by Gardner's incisive expertise. Beginning with.


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In its twelve sections, The Colossal Book of Math explores a wide range of areas, each startlingly illuminated by Gardner's incisive expertise. Beginning with seemingly simple topics, Gardner expertly guides us through complicated and wondrous worlds: by way of basic algebra we contemplate the mesmerizing, often hilarious, linguistic and numerical possibilities of palindromes; using simple geometry, he dissects the principles of symmetry upon which the renowned mathematical artist M.

Escher constructs his unique, dizzying universe. Gardner, like few thinkers today, melds a rigorous scientific skepticism with a profound artistic and imaginative impulse. His stunning exploration of "The Church of the Fourth Dimension," for example, bridges the disparate worlds of religion and science by brilliantly imagining the spatial possibility of God's presence in the world as a fourth dimension, at once "everywhere and nowhere.

With boundless wisdom and his trademark wit, Gardner allows the reader to further engage challenging topics like probability and game theory which have plagued clever gamblers, and famous mathematicians, for centuries.

Whether debunking Pascal's wager with basic probability, making visual music with fractals, or uncoiling a "knotted doughnut" with introductory topology, Gardner continuously displays his fierce intelligence and gentle humor. His articles confront both the comfortingly mundane—"Generalized Ticktacktoe" and "Sprouts and Brussel Sprouts"—and the quakingly abstract—"Hexaflexagons," "Nothing," and "Everything.

Admired by scientists and mathematicians, writers and readers alike, Gardner's vast knowledge and burning curiosity reveal themselves on every page. The culmination of a lifelong devotion to the wonders of mathematics, The Colossal Book of Mathematics is the largest and most comprehensive math book ever assembled by Gardner and remains an indispensable volume for the amateur and expert alike.

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Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Gardner's array of absorbing puzzles and mind-twisting paradoxes opens mathematics up to the world at large, inspiring people to see past numbers and formulas and experience the application of mathematical principles to the mysterious world around them.

With articles on topics ranging from simple algebra to the twisting surfaces of Mobius strips, from an endless game of Bulgarian solitaire to the unreachable dream of time travel, this volume comprises a substantial and definitive monument to Gardner's influence on mathematics, science, and culture. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. Published September 17th by W. Norton Company first published September 10th More Details Original Title. Other Editions 1.

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Be the first to ask a question about The Colossal Book of Mathematics. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of The Colossal Book of Mathematics. Mar 20, Louisa rated it it was amazing Shelves: science , mathematics.

One does not need any math skills to enjoy this rich collection of essays on the history of mathematics, its imprint on philosophy and literature, the art of Escher, fractals, tesseracts, paradoxes, hexaflexagons and many other wonderful things. The perfect desert island book.

Martin Gardner non ha bisogno di presentazione. In pratica, assieme al suo compagno The Colossal Books of Problems, questo volume raccoglie il meglio della sua produzione apparsa nella rubrica "Mathematical Games" dello Scientific American. Chi ha doviziosamente collezionato tutti i suoi libri non trova praticamente nulla di nuovo, se non qualche rara aggiunta di nuovi risultati trovati tra la pubblicazione originaria delle raccolte e il Dec 09, Jim rated it it was amazing.

Martin Gardner, master of all things puzzling, mathe-magical, and philosophical read the "whys of a philosophical scrivener" delights me with his finest book. Discover the paradox of intransitive games; where you always lose even though you get to choose your team first.

Jan 29, Brett rated it really liked it Shelves: mathematics. This is a treasure of recreational mathematics. Fascinating illustrations and Gardner's easy to read prose make this a great read.

Jun 19, Craig rated it it was amazing. An incomparably entertaining collection of Gardner's most interesting mathematical columns. For a casual mathematics lover, I cannot even imagine a more enjoyable book.

Jun 15, Stephen Cranney rated it liked it. I would have rated it higher, but some of the material was a bit dated.

Excellent exposition of recreational mathematics. View 1 comment. Apr 14, John Orman rated it really liked it. A wonderful tour of all of mathematics, told in the popular style of Martin Gardner. Jan 08, Aakash Dalal rated it it was amazing. May 20, Ryan Shuck rated it liked it. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.

A broad range of topics in Math discussed briefly. Some I had not known. Mar 23, Sourabh Das rated it it was amazing. Feb 21, Frank rated it liked it Shelves: non-fiction , math-science. An eclectic mix of deep insights and triviality; all told engagingly in MG's characteristically light manner. In other words, just the way my generation fondly remembers MG.

Dec 21, Napalmlolita rated it liked it. On some subjects, like higher-dimensional geometry, there is more information that you could possibly want without being a math professor. On some subjects, like the physics of Planiverse, there is not enough information to satisfyingly conclude the chapter.

It is interesting book, but not well-balanced. Sep 02, Mike rated it it was amazing. I've taken it off my Reading shelf because it's the kind of book I'll go back to for the rest of my life. Each chapter opens up new avenues of study and reading the same chapter a few months later awakens even newer interests.

Great stuff. May 17, Eva Filoramo rated it it was amazing. La bibbia della matematica ricreativa. Absolute delight. Apr 25, Slickmez rated it really liked it. Only skimmed it. Has some interesting problems and concepts. Apr 01, Daniel rated it liked it. I read this at night sometimes. Not in any particular order. It helps me sleep. Jan 20, Brian rated it liked it. Gardner's math puzzles are very entertaining. I gave up on making my way through the book, it seems more suited to picking up every now and then to find an interesting tidbit.

Nov 14, Alienindie rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites. Endless cornucopia of stimulating ideas! Dec 09, Sarah S rated it really liked it. Very challenging puzzles! Jake rated it really liked it Apr 16,

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He has written over 80 books, mainly popular mathematics, and has won three gold medals for his work on the public understanding of science. That's what makes the genre so important: we have to change that perception. Mathematics is the Cinderella science: undervalued, underestimated, and misunderstood. Yet it has been one of the main driving forces behind human society for at least three millennia, it powers all of today's technology, and it underpins almost every aspect of our daily lives.

School mathematics is so focused on getting the right answer and passing the exam that there is seldom an opportunity to find out what it's all for. The hard core of real mathematics is extremely difficult, and it takes six or seven years to train a research mathematician after they leave school. Popular mathematics provides an entry route for non-specialists. It allows them to appreciate where mathematics came from, who created it, what it's good for, and where it's going, without getting tangled up in the technicalities.

It's like listening to music instead of composing it. Its history reveals the subject as a human activity and gives a feel for the broad flow of ideas over the centuries. Biographies of great mathematicians tell us what it's like to work at the frontiers of human knowledge.

The great problems, the ones that hit the news media when they are finally solved after centuries of effort, are always fascinating. So are the unsolved ones and the latest hot research areas. The myriad applications of mathematics, from medicine to the iPad, are an almost inexhaustible source of inspiration.

The self-taught Indian genius Srinivasa Ramanujan had a flair for strange and beautiful formulas, so unusual that mathematicians are still coming to grips with their true meaning. He was born into a poor Brahmin family in and was pursuing original research in his teens. In , he was brought to work at Cambridge. He died of malnutrition and other unknown causes in , leaving a rich legacy that is still not fully understood. There has never been another mathematical life story like it: absolutely riveting.

One of the great cult books, a very original take on the logical paradoxes associated with self-reference, such as "this statement is false".

Frequent dramatic dialogues between Lewis Carroll's characters Achilles and the Tortoise motivate key topics in a highly original manner, along with their friend Crab who invents the tortoise-chomping record player. DNA and computers get extensive treatment too. In his long-running Mathematical Games column in Scientific American, Gardner — a journalist with no mathematical training — created the field of recreational mathematics.

On the surface his columns were about puzzles and games, but they all concealed mathematical principles, some simple, some surprisingly deep. He combined a playful and clear approach to his subject with a well-developed taste for what was mathematically significant. The book consists of numerous selections from his columns, classified according to the mathematical area involved. Learn how to make a hexaflexagon and why playing Brussels sprouts is a waste of time.

A thoroughly readable account of the meaning of truth in mathematics, presented through a series of quirky adventures in the Greek Islands, the jungles around the Orinoco River, and elsewhere. Examines tricky concepts like infinity, topology, and probability through tall tales and anecdotes. Three different kinds of truth are examined: formal classical logic, the role of the infinite, and inference by plausible reasoning.

The story of the student who believed nothing except his calculator is an object lesson for everyone who thinks mathematics is just 'sums'. In Francis Guthrie, a young South African mathematician, was attempting to colour the counties in a map of England. Guthrie discovered that he needed only four different colours to ensure that any two adjacent counties had different colours. After some experimentation he convinced himself that the same goes for any map whatsoever.

This is the remarkable story of how mathematicians eventually proved he was right, but only with the aid of computers, bringing into question the meaning of "proof".

It contains enough detail to be satisfying, but remains accessible and informative throughout. The classic text What is Mathematics?

It answered its title question by example. Hersh takes a more philosophical view, based on his experience as a professional mathematician. The common working philosophy of most mathematicians is a kind of vague Platonism: mathematical concepts have some sort of independent existence in some ideal world. Although this is what it feels like to insiders, Hersh argues that mathematics is a collective human construct — like money or the Supreme Court.

However, it is a construct constrained by its own internal logic; it's not arbitrary. You choose the concepts that interest you, but you don't get to choose how they behave.

Both authors are top-rank mathematicians with years of stage performances behind them, and their speciality is mathematical magic. They show how mathematics relates to juggling and reveal the secrets behind some amazing card tricks. Here's one. The magician mails a pack of cards to anyone, asking them to shuffle it and choose a card.

Then he shuffles the cards again, and mails half of them to the magician—not saying whether the chosen card is included. By return mail, the magician names the selected card. No trickery: it all depends on the mathematics of shuffles. Biologists' understanding of many vital features of the living world, such as sex and survival, depends on the theory of evolution.

One of the basic theoretical tools here is the mathematics of game theory, in which several players compete by choosing from a list of possible strategies. The children's game of rock-paper-scissors is a good example. The book illuminates such questions as how genes spread through a population and the evolution of cooperation, by finding the best strategies for games such as cat and mouse, the battle of the sexes, and the prisoner's dilemma.

On the borderline between popular science and an academic text, but eminently readable without specialist knowledge. A collection of 23 science fiction short stories, each of which centres on mathematics. The high point is Norman Kagan's utterly hilarious "The Mathenauts", in which only mathematicians can travel through space, because space is mathematical — and, conversely, anything mathematical can be reality.

An isomorphomechanism is essential equipment. Between them, these tales cover most of the undergraduate mathematics syllabus, though not in examinable form. There ought to be a great classic in this top 10, and there is none greater. I've put it last because it's not popularisation in the strict sense. However, it slips in because it communicated to the world one of the very greatest ideas of all time: Nature has laws, and they can be expressed in the language of mathematics.

Using nothing more complicated than Euclid's geometry, Newton developed his laws of motion and gravity, applying them to the motion of the planets and strange wobbles in the position of the Moon. He famously said that he "stood on the shoulders of giants", and so he did, but this book set the scientific world alight. As John Maynard Keyes wrote, Newton was a transitional figure of immense stature: "the last of the magicians … the last wonderchild to whom the Magi could do sincere and appropriate homage.

Buy 17 Equations That Changed the World from the Guardian bookshop "'Popular mathematics' may sound like a contradiction in terms. The Man Who Knew Infinity by Robert Kanigel The self-taught Indian genius Srinivasa Ramanujan had a flair for strange and beautiful formulas, so unusual that mathematicians are still coming to grips with their true meaning.

The Colossal Book of Mathematics by Martin Gardner In his long-running Mathematical Games column in Scientific American, Gardner — a journalist with no mathematical training — created the field of recreational mathematics. Euclid in the Rainforest by Joseph Mazur A thoroughly readable account of the meaning of truth in mathematics, presented through a series of quirky adventures in the Greek Islands, the jungles around the Orinoco River, and elsewhere. What is Mathematics Really?

Magical Mathematics by Persi Diaconis and Ron Graham Both authors are top-rank mathematicians with years of stage performances behind them, and their speciality is mathematical magic. Games of Life by Karl Sigmund Biologists' understanding of many vital features of the living world, such as sex and survival, depends on the theory of evolution. Mathenauts: Tales of Mathematical Wonder edited by Rudy Rucker A collection of 23 science fiction short stories, each of which centres on mathematics.

The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy by Isaac Newton There ought to be a great classic in this top 10, and there is none greater. Topics Science and nature books Top 10s. Mathematics features. Reuse this content. Order by newest oldest recommendations. Show 25 25 50 All. Threads collapsed expanded unthreaded. Loading comments… Trouble loading? Most popular.

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bop.calcionotizie24.net: The Colossal Book of Mathematics: Classic Puzzles, Paradoxes, and Problems () by Gardner, Martin and a great selection of similar New, Used and Collectible Books available now at great prices. The Colossal Book of Mathematics: Classic Puzzles, Paradoxes, and Problems | Martin Gardner | download | B–OK. Download books for free. Find books. The Colossal Book of Mathematics Classic Puzzles, Paradoxes, and Problems: Number Theory, Algebra, Geometry, Probability, Topology, Game Theory, Infinity, and Other Topics of Recreational Mathematics (Book): Gardner, Martin: WW NortonThe Colossal Book of MathematicsScientific AmericanThe Colossal Book of MathThe Colossal Book of MathematicsBaker & TaylorThe author .